Essays

‘We are dealing with a given space and with people in that space’: Samuel Beckett’s Dramaturgy and the Necessity of Theatre. This is my MPhil dissertation thesis supervised by Zoë Svendsen at the University of Cambridge. It discusses the necessity of live theatre to Samuel Beckett’s dramaturgy, drawing on the extensive archival material and published sources that detail Beckett’s direct work in the theatre.

Reading Beckett Reading. This essay was written for a course entitled Phantom Tables: Philosophy and Literature (1890-present) convened by Dr. Helen Thaventhiran at the University of Cambridge. It critically examines Samuel Beckett’s reading through a discussion of his methods of note-taking in the many notebooks he kept, and his working through of philosophical ideas in his fiction.

‘Height of a tower? No, she can jump me’: The feline presence in Ulysses. This essay was written for a course on James Joyce’s Ulysses (1922) convened by Dr. Steven Morrison at the University of Nottingham in 2017. It explores the significance of Leopold Bloom’s cat through engaging with animal philosophy, anthrozoology, and Joyce scholarship.

The role of economic thought in Geoffrey Hill’s self-reflexive deliberations about the category of value as it relates to poetry. This essay explores the role of economic thought in Geoffrey Hill’s poetry, informed by Hill’s Collected Critical Writings edited by Kenneth Haynes and published by Oxford University Press in 2008. It was written for a course on twentieth-century poetry and politics convened by Dr. Bridget Vincent at the University of Nottingham in 2018.